Episode 30: Everything that's happened in the past year

Comment

Episode 30: Everything that's happened in the past year

Mark McNamee of Frontier Strategy Group rejoins the podcast to talk about the rise of populism and nationalism, Trump's foreign policy, spheres of influence, what happens when nationalists from different countries collide, whether Russian meddling in foreign elections might come back to haunt them, the possible "reverse Trump effect" boomeranging against right wing populists in Europe, the French elections, Theresa May's decision to call snap elections in Britain, and more. Recorded literally as the polls were closing in France, so we didn't know who won yet, but our analysis totally holds up anyway.

Comment

Episode 29: Who screwed up the most?

Comment

Episode 29: Who screwed up the most?

It's been a terrible few days for PR, whether it's Pepsi's ill-conceived ad, United's "re-accommodation," or Sean Spicer's accidental Holocaust denial, and much more! Ethan Cheng joins to discuss who was the absolute worst. There's not a lot of international affairs on this episode, but it was quite fun to record.

Comment

Now what?

Comment

Now what?

Joe, Roni, and Ethan prepare for Inauguration Day.

Note: This podcast was recorded before the President-Elect declared NATO "obsolete."

Comment

Episode 24: What does a post-ISIS world look like? Part 1

Comment

Episode 24: What does a post-ISIS world look like? Part 1

Daesh/ISIS/ISIL/Islamic State/the self-described Islamic State/whatever you want to call them (and it matters what you call them!) is losing territory, but the loss of a territorial foothold in Iraq and Syria might not mean the end of the group, or its ideology. Part 1 examines the current dynamics facing the group and what might happen in the coming months. (Part 2 will focus more on the group's ideology and why it has endured.) David Millar guests.

Comment

Episode 23: When will DRC vote?

Comment

Episode 23: When will DRC vote?

Christy Dehus joins the podcast to discuss the upcoming elections in the Democratic Republic of Congo; whether and when they will happen; who the candidates are; and the consequences of Dodd-Frank on DRC's mining sector.

Comment

Episode 15: What's next for Ukraine?

Comment

Episode 15: What's next for Ukraine?

As a frozen conflict settles in in Ukraine, Kiev no longer controls all its own territory. But Mark McNamee, analyst with the Frontier Strategy Group, suggests that it's Russia's weakness that has been exposed. Military power is Russia's largest remaining means of influence, McNamee argues, while the Donbass uprising was largely economic, not ethnic, in nature. So what's next for both countries? Listen to find out.

Comment

Episode 14: When did the Arab Spring go off the rails?

Comment

Episode 14: When did the Arab Spring go off the rails?

The thing they call the Arab Spring started so promisingly, but today multiple countries are in chaos or under iron-fisted dictatorial rule. What happened? Why? Are revolutions good? Are they worth it? Maybe it's too soon to tell. Julia Gronnevet and Daniel Hernandez were both journalists at United Nations Headquarters in New York at the time, and they join the podcast to recall their memories.

Comment

Episode 13: Are we learning the wrong lessons from Rwanda? Part 1

Comment

Episode 13: Are we learning the wrong lessons from Rwanda? Part 1

The Rwanda Genocide is often seen as a clarion call for international intervention in the face of evil. In fact, before, during, and after the genocide, there was extensive international intervention and much of it did more harm than good. Where the international community failed, Paul Kagame succeeded. This show considers Kagame's remarkable story and the unique factors that made the Rwanda genocide unfold the way it did.

Comment

Episode 12: Why does Namibia work?

1 Comment

Episode 12: Why does Namibia work?

Namibia suffered a brutal colonial history and has extensive extractive natural resources. Many countries with these characteristics turned out to be basket cases, but Namibia is highly stable and relatively prosperous. Why? The answer may lie in the sort of colonial history and extractive resources. Mark Gardiner and Stephanie Quinn, Ph.D candidates with Stanford University, are here to help out.

1 Comment

Episode 11: Is the liberal international order under threat?

Comment

Episode 11: Is the liberal international order under threat?

Today, the liberal international order of sovereign states faces challenges: from above, with transnational issues like terrorism, climate change, organized crime networks, and migration; from below, with internal state collapse; and from revisionism from Russia, China, and others. How fundamental are these challenges? Laura Daniels, who works for a Washington, DC think tank, joins to discuss. Merry Christmas!

For more of Laura's work, read her recent piece on the United States, Russia, and Syria.

Comment